Anti-Immigrant Law and Policy

THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION, MIGRATION AND HUMAN RIGHTS

 


AUDIO OF CHILDREN CRYING AT AN ICE FACILITY   (Reported by probublica.org)

***Update on the information below: As of July 2019 the Office of Refugee Resettlement reported holding well over 4,000 children .

THE IMPACT OF ZERO TOLERANCE POLICIES

Beginning in April 2018, the Trump Administration ordered a Zero-Tolerance policy on migrants coming to the border.  The policy extended even to those persons fleeing terrorism and gender violence in their home country, migrants who ask for refuge and protection under International human rights/asylum law.

Under the 1951 Geneva Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, asylum seekers must show that they have a well-founded fear of persecution due to their race, religion, nationality, political  opinion or membership in a particular social group, and are unable or unwilling to seek protection from the authorities in their home country.

In 2018 Trump’s Zero Tolerance policies were implemented against migrants from Central America or Mexico seeking asylum in the U.S. at the border.

Migrants were  arrested and presumed criminals and their children separated at the time of detention.  The policies authorized aggressive ICE raids in workplaces and the use of racial profiling on workers. ICE even went after  immigrants with legal residence.  

Children have been removed from families and placed in special shelters, including tent cities.

 In August 2018 punitive practices included a retaliatory re-separation of children from parent detainees at Karnes detention center, whom ICE believed were planning a hunger strike to protest their prisoner-like confinement. RAICES attorneys negotiated quickly the release of the parents whose children were traumatized by the harassment by ICE.

ACLU LAWSUIT TO END FORCED CHILD SEPARATIONS

In Ms. L. v. ICE  (2018), the ACLU sued on behalf of a mother and her 7-year-old daughter who fled violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo and then were separated from each other pursuant to Trump’s Zero Tolerance Policy.

The mother was detained 2000 miles away from her child. A federal court agreed that Ms. L’s constitutional and due process rights had been violated.

The injunction was enforced nationwide. But, the Trump administration has continued to separate children and the ACLU continues to fight the practice.

Click here for updates on the ACLU’s Ms. L. lawsuit. 

ICE HURTS FAMILIES

WHAT CAN YOU DO? 

  1. Donate to the organizations who are defending children and families against the injustices caused by anti-immigrant public policy:  ACLU, AILA , RAICES, C.A.R.A, KIDS IN NEED OF DEFENSE,  PUEBLO SIN FRONTERAS, TEXAS CIVIL RIGHTS PROJECT.

  2. Attorneys and translators:  You can help with legal assistance being provided by organizations like RAICES or American Gateways to detained migrants.   Lawyers can find volunteer opportunities through a Facebook Group: @Lawyersforgoodgovernment.

  3. Donate money, clothing, toys, household goods to the shelters that help migrants and their families to rebuild their lives.  DONATE TO MIGRANT RELIEF EFFORTS.   Learn more about the Credible Fear Interview.