A scholarship seminar for graduating law students.

This is a legal scholarship seminar.  Students are introduced to the concepts of globalization of the economy and the arguments for and against free trade, regulation of trade and its impact on women and other vulnerable groups.  There are no prerequisites, although a background knowledge of feminist, critical race/latcrit theoretical perspectives is helpful. The seminar meets the graduation writing requirement for 3L students at NIU College of Law.

This course grew out of research conducted by the instructor at the U.S.-Mexico border which examined the law and public policies of foreign trade under NAFTA on the working women, men and children employed by multinational corporations in assembly factories (“maquiladoras”). Aspects of this ongoing work may be viewed in the selected student papers published on this site.  In a nutshell the critique of unregulated free trade rests on a questioning of the liberalization of corporate activity without regard for the labor and human rights of the workers.

Students explore the relevance of gender attitudes as they intersect with race/ethnicity and class to the discourse of globalization, its purported benefits to signatory nations and its alleged burdens to the more vulnerable populations of economically dependent nations.

It is often claimed that a high majority of those employed in the global economy are young women and children, while most of the world’s poor are also female. This course engages students in discussions about how these realities are created, what role the law and public policy play in it and whether or not lawyers and the law can bring about reform and accountability of the worst abusers in the global economy.

Note: Globalization, Gender and Human Rights

Fall 2011 – Materials

Syllabus

Selected Student Papers

2010-2011

Andrea Kenny Muhs, Do Women CEOS Lead More Socially Responsible Companies? View in HTML

Ryan J. McCready, Globalization, Gender and BioPower: Transforming Labor Organizations for Informal Sectors View in HTML

Older Student Writings from the Globalization Seminar:

Niemann, Reading Twitter in Tehran (2009) View in HTML

Schuster, Same Old China, A Critique of China’s Sports’ Elite (2008)

Gara, Globalization and the Female Migrant Worker (2008)

Miller, The Janus Head of the Socially Responsible Corporation (2006)

Conradt-Adams, The International Expansion of Wal-Mart (2006)

Leninger, Harnessing the Effect of Globalization on the Bottom Line (2007)

SUGGESTED READINGS

Joan Acker, Gender, Capitalism and Globalization.

Amy Chua, World on Fire

Barbara Ehrenreich, Arlie Russell Hochschild, Global Woman

Thomas Friedman, The World is Flat  and The Lexus and the Olive Tree

Amy Goodman, Breaking the Sound Barrier

Naomi Klein, The Shock Doctrine  

John Perkins, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

Norma Iglesias Prieto, Beautiful Flowers of the Maquiladora (La Flor Más Bella de la Maquiladora)

Vandana Shiva, Stolen Harvest and BioPiracy

Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and Its Discontents